Tag Archives: Journalism

Sick and Tired!

By: Agha Haider Raza

Over the past week Pakistan has read many different news items. From the passing of the 18th amendment to the bomb blast at the US Consulate, much is happening. Some may say the stories are for the betterment of our country while others may disagree. In my mind the successful visit of the Foreign Minister and his entourage to the United States gave Pakistan some much needed positive press. However, the current witch-hunt carried out by the Chief Justice and the ugly battle over the reopening of Zardari’s corruption cases has embarrassed many of those who fought for the independence of the judiciary. Now do not get me wrong, as much as I enjoyed protesting on the streets of Lahore for the reinstatement of the nation’s top judge, I can’t fathom Mr. Iftikhar’s current agenda of picking and choosing his enemies. When will we be able to see actual results from the “democratically” elected officials and the “independent” judiciary we as a nation have struggled to achieve for 62 years? When will stop pointing fingers and vilifying those whom we disagree with? Or have we gotten used to being stuck in this whirlpool of revengeful politics. Honestly, we Pakistanis have gotten sick and tired of the lies and broken promises. Continue reading


I’m Back!

Sorry for the absence – but as per the rules of my dad, academics comes first.  It was getting a bit too hectic juggling work and the blog.  Anyways, getting back to Pakistani politics we are surely seeing a shift in the political environment.  I had written a few weeks ago in regards to a new dawn that was being witnessed with the arrest of key Taliban leaders. With the Rabbani committee signatories having penned down their names on the 18th amendment, the constitution will be reverted to an almost 1973 like condition. Regardless of the political climate we have many calling for the re-opening of corruption cases against the President and as Ansar Abbassi puts it “his cronies”. If Zardari has taken a single penny out of the treasury for his personal use and the umbrella of corruption – then try him by all means necessary. But respect the institutions present in the country rather than pitting them against each other. These tactics are becoming rather monotonous and irritating and its high time these “news analysis” encourage growth and development in the country rather than inviting the military or judiciary to step into the president’s house.

Poor schooling slows anti-terrorism effort in Pakistan

By: Griff Witte

Western officials tend to blame Islamic schools, known as madrassas, for their role as feeders to militant groups, but Pakistani education experts say the root of the problem is the public schools in a nation in which half of adults cannot sign their own name. The United States is hoping an infusion of cash — part of a $7.5 billion civilian aid package — will begin to change that, and in the process alter the widespread perception that Washington’s only interest in Pakistan is in bolstering its military. Continue reading

Obsession with Zardari; Not in the New Year!

By: Agha Haider Raza

It has of late become frustrating to read the newspapers in Pakistan.  If the once a week suicide bombings are not bad enough, there is a constant Zardari bashing in the news.   I understand the resentment towards him, and to some extent even comprehend why so many individuals constantly write against President Zardari.  However, the question that I have is what good comes out of it?  If you can tell me that by having Zardari removed, we will see peace in Pakistan, the bombings will cease, inflation will come down, the poor will be looked after and all other social problems will be quelled, than I will jump on the anti-Zardari bandwagon.   But until then, zip it! Continue reading

How much more?

By: Shyema Sajjad

After weeks and weeks of harping on the ‘do more’ note, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown finally shed his rhetoric for about an hour on Thursday and acknowledged (at least for the cameras) that the international community is ‘impressed with Pakistan’s effort to fight terror.’ About time, don’t you think? Continue reading

Learn from yesterday for a better tomorrow

By: Osama Bin Javaid

Afghanistan is a mess and a byproduct of the Cold War. It has reached its present state due to plundering, both intentional and unintentional, by vested interests of internal and external powers. As is well known by now, in the 1980s, the CIA-funded extremist literature and systematic brainwashing created monstrous killing machines, not just in numbers, but in generations. Meanwhile, the Pakistani intelligence agencies knowingly remained tools in the grander scheme because they could salvage two cents from the dollars being pumped in. Continue reading

Pakistan conspiracy theories stifle debate

By: Ahmed Rashid

Switch on any of the dozens of satellite news channels now available in Pakistan.

You will be bombarded with talk show hosts who are mostly obsessed with demonising the elected government, trying to convince viewers of global conspiracies against Pakistan led by India and the United States or insisting that the recent campaign of suicide bomb blasts around the country is being orchestrated by foreigners rather than local militants.

Viewers may well ask where is the passionate debate about the real issues that people face – the crumbling economy, joblessness, the rising cost of living, crime and the lack of investment in health and education or settling the long-running insurgency in Balochistan province.

The answer is nowhere. Continue reading